Home

Page One

Animation Cels

Art Gallery

Articles

Auctions

Banks

Betty Page Theater

Cartoon Theater

CDs

Comedy Club

Disney

DVDs

Freebies

Links

Mamie's Column

Memorabilia

Models

Movie Trailers

Movies/TV

Film/TV Pix

Serials

Major Andersen's SP Museum

Original Art

Parody Theater

Posters Lobby Cards

Radio

Ray Guns

Records

Reproductions

Saturday Morning TV

Sci-Fi Apparel

Space Patrol Gold

Spotlight On 

Star Trek

Star Wars

Statues

Sunday Comics

Swap Talk

Toys

Sci-Fi Toys

Toy Vehicles

UFO Report

Vid Juke Box 

Wolfs Page

3D Gallery

3D Theater

80s Rock Scene

 

 

YOUR TIME MACHINE TO THE PAST!

Contact Us: Swapsale@aol.com 

A LOOK AT

PIN UP GIRLS

A pin-up girl or pin-up model is a model whose mass-produced pictures see wide appeal as pop culture. Pin-ups are intended for informal display. Pin-up girls are glamour models, fashion models, and actresses.

Pin-up may also refer to drawings, paintings and other illustrations done in emulation of these photos (see the List of pinup artists). The term was first attested to in English in 1941; however the practice is documented back at least to the 1890s. The pin up images could be cut out of magazines or newspapers, or be from postcard or chromo-lithographs, and so on. Such photos often appear on calendars, which are meant to be pinned up anyway. Later, posters of pin-up girls were mass-produced.

Many pin ups were photographs of celebrities who were considered sex symbols. One of the most popular early pin-up girls was Betty Grable. Her poster was ubiquitous in the lockers of G.I.s during World War II. Other pin-ups were artwork, often depicting idealized versions of what some thought a particularly beautiful or attractive woman should look like. An early example of the latter type was the Gibson girl, drawn by Charles Dana Gibson. The genre also gave rise to several well-known artists specializing in the field, including Alberto Vargas and George Petty, and numerous lesser artists such as Art Frahm.

The term "cheesecake" is synonymous with pin-up photo. The earliest documented print usage of this sense of cheesecake is in 1934 [1], predating pin-up, although anecdotes say the phrase was in spoken slang some 20 years earlier, originally in the phrase (said of a pretty woman) "better than cheesecake." In the 1950s, for example, there was a magazine called Cheesecake that had a young Marilyn Monroe in a yellow bikini on its cover in 1953[citation needed].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pin-up_girl

 

MORE

3-D CHEESECAKE

MORE: http://www.swell3d.com/

Most modern pin-up art can be traced back to the "Gay 90's". As the nineteenth century came to a close the strict public morality of the Victorian era began to weaken and posters, calendars and magazines featuring attractive women all became quite popular.

The man who is generally credited with inventing the poster was the Parisian artist, printer and designer Jules Cheret. Cheret perfected the three stone lithographic process and realized that it could be a powerful advertising tool. Not only that, but he also understood the power of an image of an attractive woman. Cheret set the example for advertisers who followed him. Regardless of whether he was publicizing a music hall, skating rink, lamp fuel or cigarette papers, the vast majority of his posters prominently feature beautiful women. His customers included the Palais de Glace on the Champs Elysées, the Folies Bergeres, and Job cigarette papers.

Cheret's style was well suited to the three stone lithographic technique. Where black and white lithographs leant themselves to the fine line work that we associate with etchings, mass produced color lithographs made by lining up the three different impressions was better suited to broad swaths of color. Being confined to 3 stones also meant either using the three primary colors and no true black (much like a three color ink jet printer a century later) or black and two colors. Cheret used both approaches, but whether he used a dark blue or black as his third ink, the central women of his work were almost always dressed in bold red, yellow and orange, witness the Folies Bergeres and Job posters here.

http://homepage.mac.com/brons/Art/Cheesecake-1-Origins.html

ART WORK

http://royalpinup.com/what-is-cheesecake/

http://elvgrenpinup.com/Elvgren_models.html

MORE

Art by Elvgren

Earl Moran

http://www.elvgrenart.com/Other_artists.htm

 

Gil Elvegren

http://www.btinternet.com/~brmerc/Pinup1.html

Bill Layne

http://www.diablo944.co.uk/Pinup%20Artists.htm

http://henning.deviantart.com/art/Martian-pinup-ImagineFX-cover-64385253

BACK TO MAIN ARTICLES PAGE

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------